Sunday, 17 May 2009

Fistful of Dollars (continued)

A Fistful of Dollars (Unidis, 1964). Italian Photobustas (6) (18.75" X 26.5")

A Fistful of Dollars, from the U.K. here is the Original British Quad poster which now reaches very high prices 30 x 40

U/A soon realised the pulling power of both James Bond and The Man with No Name, the company wasted little time in releasing this cracking double bill as featured in this U.K. Quad poster 30 x 40.
A Special thanks to my good friend Dave Worrall for providing this quality scan.

Germany seemed to produce many varied forms of Poster design for A Fistful of Dollars, here are a couple of other A1 designs (23 x 33) the first of which, has proven incredibly hard to find.


A Fistful of Dollars, from Spain, here is a rare set of Hand tinted Lobby cards


A Fistful of Dollars, Here are a couple of Spanish 1 sheet posters


This Mexican version (below) is Identical, shown here in high res for detail.

Also from a Mexican re-release, here's the complete set of lobby cards and a close up example



When it comes to the Dollar films, France has always provided fantastic artwork, below is a fine example.

A Fistful of Dollars, This is a rarely seen design from Argentina (29 x 43)

From Sweden, here's a 1975 re-release design

and here's the 1975 re-release Swedish Insert version

Below: Also from Sweden, here's an original release Insert

Below: A Fistful of Dollars Original Australian 1 sheet poster 29 x 41

Below: A Fistful of Dollars Original Australian Daybill poster

Below: A Fistful of Dollars Original Australian 3 sheet poster

Below: Yet another great example of German film artwork

Below: Here's a wonderful new shot to me, Madrid, Spain and Clint arrives to shoot A fistful of dollars! Fantastic. Picture taken April 9th 1964.

Below: A couple of great additional Spanish design posters for A Fistful of Dollars


A Fistful of Dollars (Towa 1965) Japanese STB 20 X 58

Below: The Japanese B2 poster for A Fistful of Dollars

A nice collection of 8 b/w press stills from the U.S. Re-release of 1969








Below: Four Great colour shots from A Fistful of Dollars




Below: A Fistful of Dollars (Unidis, 1964). Promotional Brochure (12 pp) (9.25" X 13.5"). Sold in Nov 2010 for $191.20
This is a very scarce promotional brochure for sales abroad, sent to key heads of theatre chains in many countries. The provenance is very interesting. It is from the Eduardo Ezio Pizzi Collection. Mr. Pizzi was in charge of all publicity and press relations for both Jolly Film (Fistful production company) and Unidis (European over-all distributor). You will see his name on the lower right spine of the back cover. It was Mr. Pizzi who took a film from pre-production all the way through release and eventual award ceremonies. Pizzi conceived many ideas for the artwork, the entire publicity launch and the release campaign. This exciting twelve page brochure features unique artwork and photographs, and text in both Italian and English. Note the credits on page two with Sergio Leone becoming Bob Robertson, Gian Maria Volonte...John Wells; Benito Stefanelli...Benny Reeves; and Bruno Carotenuto ...Carol Brown. This was an attempt to "Americanize" the film to boost initial distribution.



Below: A Fistful of Dollars (Unidis, 1964). Signed Original Artwork in Tempera by Sandro Simeoni (18" X 25") and original Ad Artwork (10" X 10.5"). Sold in Nov 2010 for $8,962.50
Offered here is the unique original painting by noted and prolific Italian poster artist Sandro Simeoni. As this is the seminal Spaghetti Western to be released in the States, the studio used American and Italian actors and changed the names of several of the credits to American names. So the small ad mock-up offered here shows Sergio Leone's name changed to Bob Robertson, which is how it appears on the earliest posters as well. They had no idea of the impact the film would have on audiences and future filmmaking. Later promotional items list the credits with the correct Italian actors and Leone's name. Clint Eastwood's iconic portrayal of the "Man with No Name" would skyrocket his career and spawn two excellent sequels. This color painting offered here was used for both the original Italian 4-Foglio and the Locandia. The tempera painting is 14.5" x 16" on matt board measuring 18" X 25" and is signed by the artist, who signed as Symeoni. The borders show some stains, smudges and some creasing, but the actual painting is in excellent condition with exceptional detail and colors. The painting retains its original Glassine cover which is hinged to the verso. The smaller black and white mock-up for a print ad, known in Italy as a "flani," measures 10" X 10.5" and is based on the original artwork by Simeoni and has the director listed as "Bob Robertson." This piece is entirely hand drawn and inked. The original painting is an incredibly important item in the history of world cinema. This is from the collection of Edoardo Ezio Pizzi, the man who handled all publicity and press relations for Unidis and Jolly Films and handled this film from pre-production through release.


Below: A Fistful of Dollars (Unidis, 1964). Color Poster Mock-up (5.5" X 8) and Photos (5) (4 shown) (7" X 9.25 to 9.5" X 12") Sold in Nov 2010 for: $2,031.50
This unique lot contains five original photos by set photographer, Julio Wizuete, of Clint Eastwood used to create the images for promotional posters. Four of the photos have informational ideas on the front and back. The lot also contains a small color mock-up for a finalized poster idea. The provenance is very interesting. These are from the Edoardo Ezio Pizzi Collection. Mr. Pizzi was in charge of all publicity and press relations for both Jolly Film (Fistful production company) and Unidis (European over-all distributor). It was Mr. Pizzi who took the film from pre-production all the way through release. Pizzi conceived many ideas for the artwork, the entire publicity launch and the release campaign.





Below: A Fistful of Dollars (Unidis, 1964). Black and White Photos (16) (2 shown) (4" X 5" - 9" X 16").
Julio Wizuete was a still photographer working for Foto Vaselli in the mid 1960s and is credited with the photos taken on set from this seminal Italian film. Included in this lot are 16 black and white, single weight, glossy photos of Clint Eastwood used by Unidis' publicity director Ezio Pizzi, to create the original posters, billboards and publicity campaign. Two of the photos are stylized printed composites which have drawn on the verso the design that would later be used on the Italian 4-foglio for the the sequel For a Few Dollars More. Two original folders with handwritten notes are included in the lot. Two of the cut-outs have minor edge tears, and there is the occasional very small corner bump. This is from the collection of Edoardo Ezio Pizzi, the man who handled all publicity and press relations for Unidis and Jolly Films and handled this film from pre-production through release. Sold in Nov 2010 for $597.50





Below: A Fistful of Dollars (Unidis, 1964). Amoldo Vaselli and Julio Wizuete Photos (12) (5 shown) (7" X 9.5"). (Bottom shot from For a few Dollars More)
This is as close as you can get to the actual production. Here are twelve amazing "on the set" photos of Clint Eastwood that were used to create poster and publicity campaign artwork. Some have the stamp of Foto Vaselli (Amoldo Vaselli), and most have instructions on the back as to how the printing of the photo was to be done. One is a great find for collectors, it has handwritten notes about what writing credits will go with the photo. It states "...di Sergio Leone (Bob Robertson)." It clearly indicates that two versions of the poster were to be printed, one for the Italian market, and one with Leone's "Americanized" entity, "Bob Robertson." He was fearful if the posters contained too many Italian names that the film would fail in the U.S.! A unique opportunity to own something amazingly unique to the title. This is from the collection of Edoardo Ezio Pizzi, the man who handled all publicity and press relations for Unidis and Jolly Films and handled this film from pre-production through release. These sold in Nov 2010 for $478.00





Below: A Fistful of Dollars (Unidis, 1964). Original "Flani" Black and White Artwork Mock-Ups (8) (4 shown) Various sizes: (6" X 17" - 10" X 19). Sold in Nov 2010 for $1,314.50
An amazingly complete set of the original "flani" artwork mock-ups. Once approved, with spell checking and contractual considerations satisfied, these went to the "zincografia" where plates were made and then sent to the various Italian newspapers. These are one-of-a-kind and the only copies. Two of the flani were for the 1964 Italian initial release in Florence, with Sergio Leone's name still concealed, with the name "Bob Robertson." Five of the flani have Sergio Leone's name written correctly, and were for the wider Italian release. What is unique about this lot is that it is a complete mini-archive of the pre-release ads, the first day of release material, and the follow up ads, all designed to attract moviegoers. An incredible chance to study the actual "roll-out" of a landmark film. There are only occasional very mild corner bumps, important handwritten notes, and mild wrinkles. This is from the collection of Edoardo Ezio Pizzi, the man who handled all publicity and press relations for Unidis and Jolly Films and handled this film from pre-production through release.




Below: A Fistful of Dollars (Unidis, R-1968). Original Tempera Painting by Michelangelo Papuzza (13" X 18"). Sold in Nov 2010 for $4,780.00
A beautiful very brightly colored tempera painting by noted Sicilian artist Michelangelo Papuzza. This is an alternate unused poster proposal, and is the only copy. Mr. Papuzza's other style painting was used for the Italian 1968 70mm release. Star Wars collectors will know the name, as Papuzza did the artwork for the very popular 1978 Italian 2-foglio for the science fiction film's release. The provenance is also very interesting. This is from the collection of Edoardo Ezio Pizzi, the man who handled all publicity and press relations for Unidis and Jolly Films and handled this film from pre-production through release and its re-releases. A terrific piece of art featuring Eastwood's "Joe" literally carrying away from all the dead bodies...a fistful of dollars. There are precious few opportunities to obtain original art connected to major, landmark films.

Below: French poster door panel style
Original Reviews:
A Fistful of Dollars (1964)
February 2, 1967
A Fistful of Dollars' Opens: Western Film Cliches All Used in Movie Cowboy

Star From TV Featured as Killer
By BOSLEY CROWTHER
Published: February 2, 1967

COWBOY camp of an order that no one has dared in American films since, gosh. Gary Cooper's "The Virginian" (which is prototypical) is flung on the screen with shameless candor in the European-made, English-dubbed, Mexican-localized Western, "A Fistful of Dollars," which opened in some 75 theaters in this area yesterday.
Just about every Western cliche that went with the old formula of the cool and mysterious gunslinger who blows into an evil frontier town and takes on the wicked, greedy varmints, knocking them off one by one, is in this egregiously synthetic but engrossingly morbid, violent film, put together as an Italian-German-Spanish co-production and shot for the most part in Spain.
There's this fellow who comes out of nowhere, laconic and steely-eyed, looking for business as a killer and fantastically swift on the draw. There are these families, the Baxters and the Rojos, locked in an ineffectual feud over who will control the smuggling business that centers in this Mexican town. There's the timid cantina proprietor, the coffin-maker waiting for clients — everything except the customary moral redemption and the naughty woman with the heart of gold.

It is notable that the lanky gringo who rides into San Miguel and virtually depopulates the area before he rides out again is in no way devoted to justice or aiding the good against the bad. He is an icy and cynical gunman whose only interest is what's in it for him.

Swiftly, he scan the situation. "There's money to be made in a place like this," he informs the cantina proprietor, and therewith sets about making it.

His first piece of business is to gun down four Baxters, just to show that he runs an efficient operation and clue the Rojos into hiring him. But the span of his secret activities soon includes both sides, playing them one against the other and collecting fees and bounties from each. Finally, after he has touched off a community holocaust and destroyed the last of his employers, he casually rides out of town.

Clearly, the magnet of this picture, which has been a phenomenal success in Italy and other parts of Europe, is this cool-cat bandit who is played by Clint Eastwood, an American cowboy actor who used to do the role of rowdy in the "Rawhide" series on TV. Wearing a Mexican poncho, gnawing a stub of cheroot and peering intently from under a slouch hat pulled low over his eyes, he is simply another fabrication of a personality, half cowboy and half gangster, going through the ritualistic postures and exercises of each.

His distinction is that he succeeds in being ruthless without seeming cruel, fascinating without being realistic. He is a morbid, amusing, campy fraud.

The other distinction of the picture is that it is full of spectacular violences. Sergio Leone, who directed from a script which we understand is a rewrite of the script of "Yojimbo," a Japanese samurai picture made by Akira Kurosawa with Toshiro Mifune, has crowded it with such juicy splashes as a big fat fellow being squashed by a rolling barrel, a whole squad of soldiers being massacred, and punctured men spitting gore.

Ultimately, the cool, non-hero is beaten to a bloody, swollen pulp, from which he miraculously recovers to go forth and kill his tormentors.

Filmed in hard, somber color and paced to a musical score that betrays tricks and themes that sound derivative (remember "Ghost Riders in the Sky"?). "A Fistful of Dollars" is a Western that its sanguine distributors suggest may be loosing a new non-hero on us—a new James Bond. God forbid!
A FISTFUL OF DOLLARS; directed by Sergio Leone; produced by Harry Colombo and George Papl for Jolly Film of Rome, Constantin Film of Munich and Ocean Film of Madrid; released by United Artists. At neighborhood theaters. Running time: 96 minutes.
Man With No Name . . . . . Clint Eastwood
Marisol . . . . . Marianne Koch
Ramon Rojo . . . . . John Wets
John Baxter . . . . . W. Lukschy
Esteban Rojo . . . . . S. Rupp
Benito Rojo . . . . . Antonio Prieto
Silvanito . . . . . Jose Calvo
Consuelo Baxter . . . . . Margherita Lozano
Julian . . . . . Daniel Martin
Rubio . . . . . Benny Reeves
Chico . . . . . Richard Stuyvesant
Antonio Baxter . . . . . Carol Brown