Friday, 24 July 2009

Clint 70's style

I thought this would be an idea place for sharing some photos which reflect Clint in the 1970s and may not perhaps fall under any specific film category. Publicity shots, family shots etc will feature here.
Below: Clint and Kyle at home in the late 70s, It's easy to see that Kyle was destined for a career in music!
Below: Clint at his Carmel home circa 1977
 
Below: Clint with old friend Charlton Heston, Clint once stood in for Heston at the Academy Awards in the early 1970's as Heston's car had picked up a flat on the highway. Clint agreed to step in and read his lines, unfortunately, Heston's speech was littered with references to The Ten Commandments, Cecil B and just about everything else from Heston's career, the result was similar to a train crash! Thankfully Heston came running on stage to rescue Clint from the ordeal, a classic and very funny piece of TV it was too! Burt Reynold's was splitting his guts open with laughter in the front row...
Clint: Photographed by Terry O'Neill

Below: A selection of photos of Clint by Terry O'Neill, taken during the production of Joe Kidd in 1972. Terry O'Neill (born 30 July 1938) is an English photographer. 


He gained an excellent reputation documenting the fashions, styles, and celebrities of the 1960s. O'Neill's photographs display his knack for capturing his subjects candidly or in unconventional settings. 


His work has also been featured in numerous exhibitions. He was awarded The Royal Photographic Society's Centenary medal 'in recognition of a sustained, significant contribution to the art of photography' in 2011. 

A 2010 exhibition titled Terry O'Neill, Reworked, took a unique direction with Terry's photographs. Six artists were given their choice of the photographer's imagery to re-work as they wished. O'Neill made an appearance on British television with a selection of featured interpretations and their corresponding original photographs. One vintage photograph of Sean Connery as his James Bond character, shot on the set of Diamonds Are Forever, was photo-realistically recreated using ballpoint pen. Terry expressed amazement at its four weeks completion time.


Below: Clint with daughter Alison at the family home
Clint at home in the 70s working out in the gym and on the California coast
Below: A couple of photos of Clint (one with his pal Burt Reynolds) that were taken for the cover of Time Magazine issue dated Jan 9th 1978
Below: Clint candid 1970's with arm around Claudine Longet (former Ms Andy Williams)
Below: Clint in Hotel room, New York city, 1977
Below: Clint Eastwood Interview 1974 Brian Linehan's City Lights
In this interview from 1974, Clint Eastwood talks about his career as an actor and director: the 1958 film Ambush at Cimarron Pass was "almost the picture that made me decide to quit," the TV series Rawhide, acting as an "emotional art," women in film, film critic Judith Crist, the film critic community, actress Inger Stevens and his films A Fistful of Dollars, Paint Your Wagon, Play Misty For Me and The Beguiled.
At this point in time Clint had just finished making Thunderbolt and Lightfoot and was in the middle of casting and pre-production for his next project The Eiger Sanction.
Below: The Man with No Name BBC Documentary February 1977
Iain Johnstone’s BBC Documentary was a huge influence on me as a kid. I was asked at school to write a project on a star – no guessing who I chose... It helped of course that this particular documentary was being shown at the time; I remember even recording it on to an audio cassette. It was also chosen as the Radio Times cover story for that week, which was packed with a nice article several pages long and tucked away at the rear end of the magazine – it also provided me with plenty of material to cut out and glue into my school project book. YES, I cut it up! Thankfully, I think I now own 3 copies of that particular issue.

Johnstone’s insightful documentary took cameras out to meet Eastwood in Carmel, and contained some great interview material. There are also interviews with Sergio Leone and Richard Burton among others and included some production footage from The Enforcer which Eastwood had just completed. The Man with No Name was arguably one of the earliest documentaries on Clint and I still love it. It also tied in rather nicely with Iain Johnstone’s book of the same name which was also published around the same time.
Thank you to Dave Turner, David Vernall-Downes and Jonathan Downes for allowing us to host this on the archive.

Below: Clint magazine pin-up from 1977

2 comments:

Clint Eastwood and Paul Newman said...

Thanks! I for one really love the Dirty Harry movies. Well thought out and superbly acted by Clint himself.

http://www.webthrowdown.com/224/paul-newman-vs-clint-eastwood/

Clint's archive said...

Thanks for your comment, please feel free to stop by anytime
The Clint Eastwood Archive